Work smarter with SQL Server Management Studio

Do you work with the ‘Microsoft SQL Server Management Studio’ regularly. Let’s say at a weekly basis? Then please read on as I have some useful information for you which saves you time and eases your activities.
When you start the ‘Microsoft SQL Server Management Studio’ you are actually excecuting ‘C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft SQL Server\130\Tools\Binn\ManagementStudio\Ssms.exe’ You can however add some parameters like servername, instancename, databasename and credentials. Example:

Suppress the splash screen at startup:
“C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft SQL Server\130\Tools\Binn\ManagementStudio\Ssms.exe” -nosplash

Suppress the splash screen at startup and connect to the default instance using your current Windows Account (Windows Authentication):
“C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft SQL Server\130\Tools\Binn\ManagementStudio\Ssms.exe” -nosplash -S . -E
Please note the little dot! The little dot represents the current local SQL Server!

Suppress the splash screen at startup and connect to the instance ‘NAV’ using your current Windows Account (Windows Authentication):
“C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft SQL Server\130\Tools\Binn\ManagementStudio\Ssms.exe” -nosplash -S .\NAV -E

If you don’t use SQL Server Management Studio 2016 please replace 130 with the corresponding version you are using.

A list of parameters you could specify:

Microsoft SQL Server Management Studio
Usage:

ssms.exe [-S server_name[\instance_name]] [-d database] [-U user] [-P password] [-E] [-nosplash] [file_name[, file_name]*] [-log [file_name]?] [-?]

[-S The name of the SQL Server instance to connect to]
[-d The name of the SQL Server database to connect to]
[-E] Use Windows Authentication to login to SQL Server
[-U The name of the SQL Server login to connect with]
[-P The password associated with the login]
[-nosplash] Suppress splash screen
[file_name[, file_name]*] Names of files to load
[-log [file_name]?] Logs SQL Server Management Studio activity to the specified file for troubleshooting
[-?] Displays this usage information

With this information you could now easily create some shortcuts to work  smarter. An example:

shortcut-target

I Hope I saved you a little bit of time and Mouse Clicks.

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